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Belianska Cave

Belianska Cave (Slovak: Belianska jaskyňa) is a stalactite cave in the Slovak part of the Tatra mountains, the largest and the only one open to the public in the Tatras. It is located above the settlement of Tatranská Kotlina, which is a part of the town of Vysoké Tatry. The cave was discovered in the 18th century, although it is presumed that it was used by pre-historic people.[1] The cave was opened in 1884 and electrically lit in 1896. Entrance to the cave is located at an altitude of 890 metres. The cave is 3,641 m long[2], with two circuits available to the visitors, with the longer one having the length of 1,752 m.[1]

Bojnická hradná jaskyňa

Bojnická hradná jaskyňa

Bystrianska Cave

Bystrianska Cave is a limestone cave located on the southern slopes of the Nizke Tatry Mountains, along the road towards Banska Bystrica, at the southern edge of the town of Bystrá, in the Brezno District, Banskobystrický region, in Slovakia. Discovered in 1926 by E. and A. Hollmann and J. Kovalčík, the cave is 2637 m in length and 95 m in depth. About 490 m of the cave has been made public in 1968.

Bystrianska Cave

The cave consists primarily of dark limestone rocks formed in tectonic cracks by water corrosion and gradually enlarged by the underground river Bystra. The lower entrance to the cave was opened in 1932. The precipice Peklo, through which the access to a new cave was found, was discovered in 1926.[1]. The Old and New Cave were connected by J. Majko and J. Vytřísalová together with their colleagues in 1955. In 1951 the Mostárenské Halls were discovered. The Bystrianska Cave is considered to be the most important cave of the Upper Hron River Valley. The Lower Guerilla Hall and some other parts of the cave have been used for speleotherapy since 1971.

Demänovská Cave of Liberty

Demänovská Cave of Liberty (Slovak: Demänovská jaskyňa Slobody) is a karst cave in Low Tatras in Slovakia. Discovered in 1921 and opened to the public in 1924, it is the most visited cave in Slovakia. The public entrance is at an altitude of 870 metres (2,850 ft). Of the total length of 8,126 metres (26,660 ft), 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) are open to the public. Cave bear bones were found in a passage now named Bear's Passage (Slovak: Medvedia chodba).

Demänovská Ice Cave

Demänovská Ice Cave or Demänovská ľadová jaskyňa (in Slovak) is an ice cave in the Demänovská Valley (Low Tatra) in Slovakia. It was first mentioned in 1299 and is one of oldest known caves in Europe. After the opening of Demänovská jaskyňa Slobody in 1924, interest in this cave declined. It was reopened to the public after the reconstruction of wooden stairs and electrical lighting in 1952, with 680 m accessible out of the 1,975 m. Currently, the route for visitors is 850 m long and takes about 45 minutes.

Dobšinská Ice Cave

Dobšinská Ice Cave or Dobšinská ľadová jaskyňa (in Slovak) is an ice cave in Slovakia, near the mining town of Dobšiná in the Slovak Paradise. Since 2000 it is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as a part of Caves of Aggtelek Karst and Slovak Karst site. It lies 130 m above the Hnilec River, and the entrance is at an altitude of 970 m. The cave was discovered in 1870 by a royal mining engineer, Eugen Ruffinyi though the entrance was known from time immemorial as Studená diera (Cold Hole). The cave was open to the public one year after its discovery. In 1887, it was the first electrically lit cave in Europe. At about this time 7,171 square meters of the cave's known area of 8,874 square meters were reported covered with ice. The total ice volume was estimated at 125,000 cubic meters[1] . The cave floor descends from the entrance which faces North; this results in rapid cooling of the cave in winter as cold air can fall down. On the other hand, the interior is quite protected from the warm environment in summer. Thus the annual temperature average stays around 0°C. The cave iced up, as this cycle repeated for many centuries. The total length of the cave is 1,483 m[2] (some sources claim 1,232 m[3]), of which 515 m are open to the public from May to September.

Domica

Domica is the biggest cave in the Slovak Karst in southern Slovakia, Rožňava District. It is a part of the cave complex that continues into the cave Baradla (Aggtelek) in Hungary. It was discovered in 1926 by Ján Majko. Since 1932, 1,600 metres (5,200 ft) of the 5,140 metres (16,860 ft) are open to public. The cave is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list since 1995 as a part of Caves of Aggtelek Karst and Slovak Karst site.

Driny

Driny is a limestone cave in West Slovakia in the Little Carpathians Mountains. It is located around 2 km southwest of the village of Smolenice. The cave's entrance altitude is 399 m. The first attempt to enter the cave was made by Prussian soldiers, who were camping nearby during the Austro-Prussian War. It was finally explored in 1929, and in 1934 the first 175 meter route was opened. In 1950 other parts of the cave were explored and in 1959, the cave was reopened. The cave was declared a nature monument in 1968 and became part of the newly designated Little Carpathians Protected Landscape Area in 1976. Today, from the total explored length of 636 m, 550 m are open to the public.

Gombasek Cave

Gombasek Cave or Gombasecká jaskyňa (in Slovak) and Gombaszögi-barlang (in Hungarian) is a stalactite and stalagmite cave in the Slovak Karst, Slovakia. It is named after the settlement of Gombasek, which belongs to the village of Slavec. It is located in the Slovak Karst National Park, in the Slaná river valley, approximately 15 km south of Rožňava. The cave was discovered on 21 November 1951 by volunteer cavers. In 1955, 300 m out of 1,525 m were opened to the public. Currently, the route for visitors is 530 m long and takes about 30 minutes. The cave is also used for "speleotherapy" as a sanatorium, focused on airway diseases. Since 1995, the Gombasek Cave is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as a part of Caves of Aggtelek Karst and Slovak Karst.

Harmanecká Cave

Harmanecká Cave or Harmanec Cave (Slovak: Harmanecká jaskyňa, Hungarian: Hermándi barlang) is a stalactite cave in Central Slovakia. It is located in the Staré Hory and Kremnica mountain ranges and close to the Veľká Fatra mountains. The closest villages are Harmanec and Dolný Harmanec; Banská Bystrica is around 16 km south east of the cave. The entrance to the cave has been known since time immemorial. But only in 1932 M. Bacúrik started to explore the cave further. Soon the speleologists discovered other parts of the cave. A 720-metre section, out of the known length of 1,500 m, has been opened to the public since 1950.

Jasovská Cave

Jasovská Cave (Slovak: Jasovská jaskyňa, and Hungarian: Jászói barlang) is a stalactite cave in the Slovak Karst in Slovakia. It is located near the village of Jasov, around 25 km from Košice. The cave was partly opened for the public in 1846, making it the oldest publicly accessible cave in Slovakia. The lower parts of the cave were discovered in 1922 to 1924 and a concrete footpath was built and electrical lightning was installed in 1924. 852 metres out of 2148 m are open to the public. Many archaeological discoveries, especially from the Paleolithic, Neolith and Hallstatt periods, have been made in the cave. Along with other caves of the Slovak Karst, it is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as a part of the Caves of Aggtelek Karst and Slovak Karst site.

Ochtinská Aragonite Cave

Ochtinská Aragonite Cave (Slovak: Ochtinská aragonitová jaskyňa, Hungarian: Martonházi-aragonitbarlang[citation needed]) is a unique aragonite cave situated in southern Slovakia, near Rožňava. Although only 300 m long, it is famous for its rare aragonite filling. There are only three aragonite caves discovered in the world so far. In the so-called Milky Way Hall, the main attraction of the cave, white branches and clusters of aragonite shine like stars in the Milky Way. The cave was discovered by chance by Jan Bystricky in 1954 and opened to the public in 1972. Along with other caves of the Slovak Karst, it is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list as a component of Caves of Aggtelek Karst and Slovak Karst site.

Važecká Cave

Važecká Cave (Slovak: Važecká jaskyňa, and Hungarian: Vázseci-barlang) is a stalactite cave near the village of Važec in northern Slovakia. It lies at an altitude of 748 metres, in the Liptov Basin near the Biely Váh River, on the northern edge of the Low Tatra mountain range. The cave was discovered in 1922. With the length of 530 m, 230 m are open to the public. Although it is one of the shorter caves, it is known for its rich stalactite decoration, as well as for its cave fauna.